Refugee Extortion

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Here’s something that no one is talking about. I’ve spent a bit of time in Afghanistan. One problem that we’ve had there is extremely Pro-American Afghans suddenly “turning” on the US/Coalition. Later, we find out that these persons families were targeted. The guy is given a choice. Commit this heinous act and kill Americans or ISIS/Taliban/Haqqani kills their daughter, son, mother, father, wife, etc.

How do we know that this is not the case with this seemingly pro-American Somali.

He may not be the terrorist. He may be a fellow victim.

What would you do if you received a video or a letter stating that your family will be killed, tortured, raped and/or brutalized if you don’t do as ordered by the terrorists. As we accept more and more refugees, these will be issues which America must deal. Accept refugees and you accept a “knapsack” of challenges.

This possibility must be taken into account when accepting refugees who have family in any area which is held by ISIS, the Taliban or any other Extremist Group.

Or…we could take out the real enemy — Saudi Arabia.

 

Islam Does Not Advocate Pedo-Rape & Jesus Never Spoke Out Against Slavery

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Here is a comment that is no so uncommon amongst those who wish to criticize Islam while being ignorant of their own history and religion:

 

 Yeah the “prophet” Mohamed also said forcing little girls to be married at 6, and raped was ok. Fuck this posting and the politically correct bullshit behind it. What other religion advocates for rape, murder, terror, beheading, and the stoning of women simply because some guy is attracted to her? Fuck jihad.

I dislike all religions. That said, Mohammad never said that “forcing little girls to be married at age 6, and raped was ok.”  Mohammad did marry several wives and he did marry a young girl named Aisha.  Aisha was somewhere between the ages of 9 & 13.  That’s bad enough.  No need to go into full hyperbole mode on that one.  He did not rape her.  As was the custom in that age, he waited until her “first blood” to consummate the marriage.  This was a custom in Europe at that time as well.  This was not so unusual in America as recent as the late 1800s.

If one is going to criticize Mohammad, one should probably first look closer to home.  There is a good chance that someone in your recent ancestry is guilty of the same behavior…AND thought it normal.  If one is going to criticize something, one should have at least a basic understanding of that which one is criticizing. Otherwise, one simply looks ignorant.

No religion that I know of specifically advocates rape. However, both Islam and Christianity advocate murder, terror, stoning, etc. Also, Christians have raped and employed rape as terror. This happens today in Africa right alongside Muslim rapine. American “Christians” have been found guilty of raping young girls in all of our wars. What does Jesus say about motes and eyes, etc? Judge not, lest ye be judged. I know that Christians hate to actually use the Bible except as a weapon of mass distraction but it contains much wisdom if only Christians would actually read the damn thing.

Read the Bible. It is horrifically similar to the Qu’ran. As a matter of fact, much in the Qu’ran is plagiarized from the Bible.

Christians would know this IF THEY ACTUALLY READ THE fuckin’ BIBLE as opposed to the average Christian using it as a home decoration and nothing more. lol

It should embarass Christians that one such as I have read the Bible and written about the Bible at University, yet I am not Christian. While the majority of Christians have never read the Bible except in snippets and overheard soundbites from TV, their pastor or on the internet.

I am often irked to hell by Christians due to their ignorance about their own mythology. They ignore all of the horrors and atrocities committed by their own while castigating others for theirs.

Let’s take Jesus. Jesus talks about slavery in the Bible. Basically, he tells slaves to “honor” their masters.  What does this say about the attitudes of Jesus Christ about/towards slavery.

1. Jesus thought slavery to be normal.
2. He didn’t think it a sin for one man to own another.
3. Female slaves were sold as sexual objects and subjected to rape on a daily and sometimes hourly basis.
4. Honoring one’s master is, in part, being obedient. Therefore, when female slave is told to bend over and allow her master to enter her anal cavity, Jesus had already commanded slaves to honor their masters.

Did Jesus think that slavery was ok. Did Jesus think that owning another human was just. Was Jesus telling female slaves that their rape at the hands of their master was good in the eyes of God.  Probably not. I would like to think that Jesus thought that rape of slaves was bad. I would like to think that slavery was seen as an evil by Jesus.

The simple fact of the matter is that Jesus did not speak out for or against slavery. Was slavery simply not important enough a social subject for Jesus to speak of. Was slavery so unremarkable in the time in which Jesus lived that he simply felt it something about which there was no necessity to speak.

I can’t answer these questions. I can only say that Jesus said nothing about Slavery itself.

What does that say about Jesus the man? To me, it says that he was a man of his time. That, to me, is revealing. It says to me that he was a reflection of his times which means that he was mortal and not a God or a son of God any more than you or I.  A God or a representative of God would not be affected by local or era customs.  He would be above and beyond such things.

Yet, the West has spent nearly 2,000 years worshiping this man as well as murdering and conquering in his name.

And what does that say about us.

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Islamic Sharia and the Rights of Muslim Women

After being kidnapped at the age of 16 by a group of thugs and enduring a year of rapes and beatings, Assiya Rafiq was delivered to the police and thought her problems were over.

Then, she said, four police officers took turns raping her.

The next step for Assiya was obvious: She should commit suicide. That’s the customary escape in rural Pakistan for a raped woman, as the only way to cleanse the disgrace to her entire family.

Instead, Assiya summoned the unimaginable courage to go public and fight back. She is seeking to prosecute both her kidnappers and the police, despite threats against her and her younger sisters. This is a kid who left me awed and biting my lip; this isn’t a tale of victimization but of valor, empowerment and uncommon heroism.

“I decided to prosecute because I don’t want the same thing to happen to anybody else,” she said firmly.

Assiya’s case offers a window into the quotidian corruption and injustice endured by impoverished Pakistanis — leading some to turn to militant Islam.

“When I treat a rape victim, I always advise her not to go to the police,” said Dr. Shershah Syed, the president of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Pakistan. “Because if she does, the police might just rape her again.”

Yet Assiya is also a sign that change is coming. She says she was inspired by Mukhtar Mai, a young woman from this remote village of Meerwala who was gang raped in 2002 on the orders of a village council. Mukhtar prosecuted her attackers and used the compensation money to start a school.

Mukhtar is my hero. Many Times readers who followed her story in past columns of mine have sent her donations through a fund at Mercy Corps, at www.mercycorps.org, and Mukhtar has used the money to open schools, a legal aid program, an ambulance service, a women’s shelter, a telephone hotline — and to help Assiya fight her legal case.

The United States has stood aloof from the ubiquitous injustices in Pakistan, and that’s one reason for cynicism about America here. I’m hoping the Obama administration will make clear that Americans stand shoulder to shoulder with heroines like Mukhtar and Assiya, and with an emerging civil society struggling for law and social justice.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/opinion/26kristof.html?_r=2&em