Race Relations

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New Guy walks up to me, hands me a pair of scissors.

“Thanks man. Appreciate it.”

Me; “Cool. Who’d you get them from?”

New Guy: “I didn’t get them from you?”

Me: “Nah…but I know. All of us White dudes look alike.”

New Guy laughing; “Ya got me. Ya got me. Pay back. Pay back.”

I just chuckled and let him in the office to give them back to the other White guy in the office.

#LMAO

 

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Norway ~ The Great White Hype

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The Left goes on and on complaining about White People, Old White men, White this and White that…

They bitch about ‪#‎WhitePrivilege‬.

They tell us all of our problems were and are created by White people.

Coz Whitey is BEE–AY–DEE…BAD!!!

Then…

They turn right around and tell us that we should be more like Norway.

Norway is one of the Whitest fucking Nations on the Whole Motherfucking Planet.

Up to and possibly exceeding 90% Crackerdom.

Another Nation mentioned is Iceland. It is also over 90% Cracker.

So, mayhap, you Lefties and LibDems are just a bunch of racist bastards afterall.

Why aren’t you pointing to all of the great success stories on the African Continent? You racist sumbitches!

 

 

Democratic Party Being Liberal Hillary Clinton Bernie Sanders

Imaginary Race, Contrived Privilege

scientific_racism_irishWho said it was easy to be successful?

I would say that Michael Jordan would take umbrage of your characterization of his work ethic and that his path was easy.

Oprah as well. She fought tooth and nail to get her opportunities.

Luck is preparation meeting opportunity. You have to have the courage to take that step.

You have to make friends and win people over.

And, hell yes, it is difficult. Nothing in life is easy.

You start poor. You are different from society at large.

This is the same in any country.

Being a dark Thai in Thailand. Being a Khmer in any country in Southeast Asia including Cambodia. Being a dark Indian or an “untouchable” or other lower caste in India. Being from a minority ethnicity in China.

What you call “White Privilege” is merely being a member of the dominant cultural/national sect, tribe, religion or ethnicity.

This is why I do not subscribe to this lunacy. It may be “White Privilege” in America. However, in Malaysia, it could be called Chinese Privilege. In Thailand, it would be called Tai privilege. In Afghanistan, it is tribal privilege. In Russia, it could be Muscovite Privilege or Kievan Privilege. In Saudi Arabia, it might be called Wahhabi privilege or Arab Saudi privilege. In Iran, it would be Persian privilege. In Kenya, it would be the Kikuyu.

This is universal. This “privilege” exists in every nation on the planet.

No, American, you are not unique. Not even in your bigotry, racism or discrimination.

No, I’m not saying that it is just. I’m simply tired of the Liberal Leftist Fantasy that this is a uniquely American or uniquely White American trait.

Hard work can get you places. Smart work gets you further. Intelligent, creative work gets you even further.

Yes, having a silver spoon will set you far in advance of your “peers” in America and in every other nation on the planet.

Is it fair? Hell no! Is it life and has it always been the way of life on this planet? Hell Yes!

Will this change? Not likely.

The only way that prejudice, bigotry, discrimination end on this planet is if all humans perish. Every last one of us.

Racism is a contrived European Colonial Construct designed to do exactly what we are allowing it to do — DIVIDE AND CONQUER!

As long as the ignorant masses continue to play the race game, we lose.

Race as it exists today is an imaginary dividing line that was brought into existence by the Monarchs, Plutocrats and other Elites of Europe.

In Roman times, Romans considered themselves a race apart from the Greeks, Germanic Tribes, the Gauls, etc. Each of those considered themselves of different racial stock from Rome.

Prior to European Colonialism and the African Slave Trade, European Elites divided themselves “racially” from the peasants.

Now, they have the ignorant masses fighting each other over the color of their skins. How stupid do we have to be to continue to fall for this.

Yet, we revel in it.

White people think themselves superior to Black people. Black people hate Latinos and Koreans. Koreans hate everyone. Jews are reviled by the masses (although this predates the creation of Europe as a supra-National collection of monarch States). Everyone hates and distrusts everyone else and we point the finger at each other over slights real and imagined.

How pathetic are we!

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I’m a White Dude

Camp Scorpion, Every 4 months

I’m a White dude — pure bred Cracker of Scots-Irish, Swiss origin. I think…that’s what legend tells me.

I’ve been subjected to racism. For instance, I was jumped by 8 Black guys when I was in the Army in Baumholder, Germany. I was one of four separate victims that night.

I never once used “Race” or “Color” to stereotype Black People. I don’t see life in binary colors.

I’ve had Black, Hispanic, Asian and, yes, White friends for as long as I can remember. I lived on Pope Street in Louisville, Kentucky. One street down the hill was Williams Street — home to the Page brothers who were pretty good boxers. We lived in the shadow of Muhammad Ali and we grew up believing him to be a larger than life hero.

I once walked into a room full of Black guys about half of whom were my friends. Jack, the guy who looked a helluva a lot like Ice Cube, yelled; “Hey fuckin’ Cracker! What the hell do you want?”

I answered; “Nothin’ Nigga!”

And the whole room cracked up laughing.

I’ve always had excellent relationships with anyone who wasn’t an ass.

I never really cared about the whole color thing on an individual level while simultaneously being fascinated by cultural differences.

Where I work now, my Boss calls me “White boy!” and I laugh and rejoin with “Nothing’, ya fuckin’ racist bastard.” And we all laugh.

I fully realize that my being White has contributed greatly to the ease with which I interact with and benefit from/with people and those who have hired me and for whom I have worked — Black, White, Hispanic, Araba, Asian and any other race you can name.

I know for a fact that being White has granted me access to places, events, people and things all over the world.

In China and most of Southeast Asia, people are fascinated by my “Whtie skin.” Asia has a “White is beauty, Black is ugly” dynamic that is, quite frankly, appalling. My girlfriend of several years used to tell me that she was Black. She’s approximately the color that most White girls aspire to when they are tanning. And when she tans, White women are jealous of it.

Strange, I know.

I constantly tell my girlfriend that she is beautiful. “Black” skin and all.

In Afghanistan, the Afghan Officers with whom I work told me that my girlfriend looks African and is too dark and that I should find a nice White woman and then show me photos of Iranian women who are only slightly lighter skinned than my girlfriend.

Skin color is confusing. The slightest shades make huge differences to people.

In Egypt, I was granted access to touristy places that were shut off to most because the strange tourist officials wanted to take pictures with the big white guy whom they kept calling Hercules. They virtually ignored my friend Humberto who was also American of Mexican origin because, well, he looked like them.

I have benefited from my skin color. I’ve also made great sacrifices to get to where I am. I’ve risked my life and taken chances that most Americans could never dream of.

I have helped many, many people along my journey. Some White, Some Black, Some Arab, Some Asian…Muslims, Christians, Atheists and Jewish, Buddhist and Hindu.

If I thought helping them would not come back to bite me in the ass or, more importantly, hinder me in helping others, I help others. I turned down my own White cousin when she asked for help with a recommendation and I told her the reason. She had a poor track record and I didn’t want her quitting on me and ruining it for some other who deserved the assist. She understood and we are still quite close.

I say all of this not to say that I’m a good person and not racist. I fully recognize that every human has built in and learned prejudices. I am not a good person. I’m not a bad person. I’m simply a human being who tries, sometimes fails and sometimes succeeds in treating others as I would like to be treated.

When “People of Color” (such a silly term…as if we aren’t all colored uniquely) make blanket statements about White people or White Americans, I get a bit touchy.

I’m a White person. I fully realize that racism exists and I have spent my life actively fighting it. I’ve called White and Black people out on their Bigotry. When a White friend used the word “nigger” in the privacy of our barracks room, I ripped him a new one. When a Black friend said all Afghans are “worthless raghead pieces of shit,” I ripped him a new one. Likewise when folks act foolishly and stereotype all Thai people when they’ve been insulted or in some way wronged by one Thai person, I refute their lunatic assertions that all Thai people are this, that or the other.

There is no such animal as a “person of color.” There are no two people on this planet that are the same color. “White” people are not bereft of color. I know White people who grew up in predominantly Black neighborhoods who “act Black” and cannot code switch to “Whitey-eze.”

I know Black people who cannot speak urban slang or “Ebonics.” I know 2ndGen Colombian-Americans who do not speak a word of Spanish and I know Mexicans who can barely speak English.

To portray all of any people any thing is an injustice. Constantly reading articles by “People of Color” and “Allies of People of Color” (I’m not ever sure what the hell that means…) telling me that “White people are…..” or “Why White people freak out when told they are racists” and other inane articles without an ounce of nuance irritate the shit out of me.

I cringe. Why? I know the reaction to these articles is nothing more than tens of thousands of minds slamming shut!

I know that if I made a stereotyping statement about any group except for “White” people, I would be branded a racist by those of you who wish to pretend that the world is divided between “people of color” and White people.

I know that I have seen Black people treated worse in Africa than I’ve ever seen them treated in America. I was born in 1968. I know that one of my good friends holds a hell of a lot of anger because of his upbringing in South Carolina and his Grandfathers treatment at the hands of White Southerners.

There is much injustice in America. There always has been. More than likely, there always will be.

There is racism, bigotry and discrimination in America. I know this for a fact.

None of these things will be solved…ever…if we do not learn how to have real, honest and open dialogue.

White people can experience bigotry including racism.

If any American ever stopped to think about it, Europeans (i.e., White People, Crackers, Whitey) are the minority on this planet. Europe began its ascendancy geo-politically a mere 400 years ago. Prior to that, the largest “White” Empire was Rome. There is much evidence that Rome was much more ethnic than the European Colonizers would have us believe.

At some point, we must begin to be honest with each other. We must be open. We must stop accusing all or none. We must accept differences. Not tolerate but ACCEPT and we must do so in an open manner.

I have seen this work.

I have always been accepted for who I am and have always accepted folks for who they are. I fell into it. I was lucky. I learned to look past differences early on in my life. I have been rewarded countless times for this fortunate accident.

It is…unfortunate that we can’t all simply accept differences and move on together.

Dear Black People…and the rest of America

13914-1 I know.  I know…I’m racist because I said “Black.”  Anyway… Dear Black People, Pls wake the fuck up. It’s the 21st Century. You have to take what you want. You can’t be a victim. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson are wrong. Not every Black American who finds success in “White America” or who joins the GOP is an Uncle Tom. The Police are corrupt and have always been corrupt. This corruption affects everyone in America. It does not only affect Black people.

Most White people are no more racist than most Black people.

Cops are Cops. Many, if not most, are corrupt, ignorant, bigoted, ill trained assholes.

Stop blaming White people. It’s long past due that this is a viable complaint.

I travel the world. Everything that Black people in America complain about has happened to me in the wider world. It’s not a White thing. It’s not an American thing. It’s a human thing.

Get over the race card. Not everything is about racism. Some of it is about what you do or do not do in this world.

Opportunity does not just come to people. People have to seek opportunity.

I work with quite a few Black people who don’t sit back and wait for someone to hand them an opportunity. They go out and make it happen.

Lots of people do this and find successes and failure. The best of us do not blame someone else for our failures. We get up and try again. We do not let failure immobilize us and blame the World or the Man or the Government or our Mommy or our Daddy. We get up and start again.

I get so tired of hearing whining little welps cry about what’s holding them back. Everyone in this world has something holding them back. I come from a family wracked by poverty and alcoholism and abuse. I got out of there and did my own thing. I made it happen for me. I made it happen and am making it happen where I am a minority and where many folks do not like me simply because I am American and White. I’m not whining about it or laying down. I’m making it happen for me and mine.

When Americans start lopping off heads with machetes and/or smashing heads with sledgehammers or shooting Black people simply because they are Black, then I’ll see a real issue. As it is, we have Cops who react violently towards Black people in a Government headed by a Black President with a Black Attorney General.

Perhaps, the problem is more complex than simply White on Black crime. Especially when 90% of crime against Black people is committed by other Black people. But…I know…we don’t want to talk about that. We only want to talk about White on Black crime which is less than 10% of the issue.

The lack of dialogue about Black on Black crime is disturbing and is racist on the part of Black Leadership. Let’s ignore the larger problem and talk about the small issue because it’s easier and there is an easy target. Let’s ignore the elephant in the room because that one is too difficult to solve and we can’t blame that one on some outsider like White folks or “The Man.” All that said, I look forward to seeing Dear White People. Apparently, there are a lot of ignorant White folk out there who haven’t a clue. However, that is America and Americans — Black and White Americans. Most of the idiots who live in America are pretty darned clueless. They’ve never been further than the largest city in their State much less the wider world. Americans need to travel. They need to get out of their little towns and their neighborhoods in their big cities. The world is amazing. It’s also a dangerous, beautiful, deadly, lively, incredible, breath taking place. The world can kill you. It can bring you life. It can give you perspective. Perspective is what most Americans lack.

This is exactly why Americans can feel guilty about events, circumstances and history that is common to the whole of the human race and feel uniquely smug and self satisfied at feeling said guilt. Americans think that America is so unique that their racism is exceptional and that their crimes are special. To many Americans, racism is America’s special shame. They feel this way due to their own ignorance of the wider world. Americans feel exceptional not only in that they feel that America has a special prerogative to dictate to the World but that we feel especially bad about the past and the actions of our ancestors. Americans actually believe that they are unique. The reality is that there is nothing unique about America. This has all been done before by Rome, Britain, the Mongols, the Chinese, the Japanese, the Egyptians, the Sumerians, the Phoenicians (who might well have come from Africa) and a whole host of Empires across the ages. Every good we have done and every evil we have committed is a repetition of earlier Empire…even our special, exceptional arrogance. American Blacks are not special either. Every trial and tribulation through which they have passed and through which they will pass is a repetition. This is the World. This is humanity.

And I find it especially humorous that the racism in America is so horrid, so wretched that one of the greatest complaints that Black Women have is that people touch their hair out of curiosity.  Then again, there is the terrifying stereotype about Waffles and Chicken. Though, I have had Black friends since I was 5 years old and am now 45 and have never heard of this nonsense. OH…THE HUMANITY!!! Who do Americans try so hard to be offended by…well, anything. It’s impossible that so many could be so offended by such trivial nonsense. It’s a profession now. We have professional Outrage Commissars who tell Americans exactly when and by how much we should be offended.  WOT WOT!!!

In summation…GET OVER YOURSELVES, AMERICA!

These girls are cute. I mean really, really cute. They made me laugh and, better yet, smile. I hope I have daughters who are as intelligent and precocious and beautiful as these two gals.

I’ll leave you with a prophet.

Obama & the Race Shield

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Bizarrely, racism in America is no longer mainly about race. Sure, race is involved in a peripheral manner, but racism has mainly become an excuse, a dodge, a way to escape responsibility.
When a black liberal is criticized, he cries racism. When liberalism fails, liberals cry racism. When the Democrat Party gets in trouble, liberals cry racism. It has become the ever present background noise of politics, like birds chirping in the forest.

I am White. I have friends of nearly every race, religion, ethnicity and political persuasion across the width and breadth of this planet. My earliest friends were Black, White, Hispanic and Asian. Included in this mix were Muslims, Hindus, Christians and Jews as well as a couple of Atheists. Most of these folks until this past decade were American but now, I number amongst my friends peoples from countries as far and wide as Scotland, Egypt, Cambodia, Thailand and Brazil.

I have been friends with this great mix of peoples for as long as I can remember.

These are not just people whom I label as friend and then ignore. I keep in touch with these people. I live with them. I work with them. I have helped them find employment. I have hired them for employment. I have assisted some financially. I have helped them improve their English. I have taught some life skills and job skills. They have hired me and recommended me for promotion.  I have learned life and job skills from them.  I have enjoyed their company and companionship and do so at this time. I have invited them to my homes and the home of my parents and siblings. I have played with their children and befriended their families.

I have debated various topics ranging from culture to religion and politics with them and discuss said topics and opinions with them openly. I agree with them on some topics and disagree with them on others.

I have lived my life openly and with as much love, warmth, humanity and companionship as is humanly possible.

Yet, if I dare not agree with Obama I am a racist.

On a smaller playing field, these same accusations were thrown at me when I dared to criticize Tubby Smith at Kentucky. Yet, when I criticize John Calipari, I am simply called a dumbass. lol

Does no one else see the evil in this?

“Racism” is constantly at the forefront of the Obama Administration conversation.

I am not saying that racism does not exist. However, the Democrats reacted in similar manner to all things Bush. The Democrats called Bush every name in the book and even conjured more juicy names and labels for him and Cheney. No one said it was because of Race.

Republicans treated Bill Clinton far worse than they treat Obama. Yet, racism wasn’t constantly thrown in the face of the opponent.

Race, for better or worse, is a factor in nearly every facet of life across the whole of this planet.

The Obama Administration and Democrats act as though racism was invented in America by White Southerners.

It’s a ruse. It is a sidebar. It’s a deflection. It is cover and concealment for corruption.

They called the opponents of Nagin in NOLA racists. A few years later, Nagin is found to have been a corrupt turd and that corruption was a major factor in the fiasco that was Katrina.

Yet, no Democrat has come forward to say; “Doh! They were correct. Nagin was a turd. There was merit to the accusations and criticism.”

Racism with the Obama Administration is a crutch and nothing more. It has become meaningless.

Obama could be assassinated by the KKK and because of this administration’s constant use of Racism as a political tool, I’d find myself doubting that racism was the real reason behind the assassination.

This despite the fact that I have witnessed real racism against the Obama Administration.

Misty Copeland — Ballerina

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Ballet is, culturally speaking, a European dance. That a black person (really…she’s multi-racial — African-America, German and Italian) would become a ballerina is only striking in that she chose a culturally non-aligned field of interest and that only so if she was of pure African escent.  It is not interesting or remarkable that a black person would excel at ballet simply because of her race. It is more interesting that she mastered this skill and was talented enough to do so having started at a late age.  What seems to have been discounted is her German and Italian heritage.  Apparently, if one is “Black” or “African America,” no other part of one’s heritage is of consequence.  That seems odd to me.  Why would I acknowledge one part of me and not the others.  I don’t believe that Ms. Copeland is guilty of this.  However, it seems that the rest of the world has forgotten that Ms. Copeland is a complete human being and not just broken or scattered and discarded pieces.

Am I to become excited when the first White person becomes a master at some African dance or cultural interest/skill? Perhaps, we should go back and seek out the first White person to master the banjo, the first White person to master the canoe, the first White person to master Arabic belly dance, the first White person to master Chinese calligraphy. Hell, the list could go on and on. We could move on to the Asian peoples and Arabic peoples and find the first of those persons to master non-culturally aligned talents and skills.

I congratulate her on her talent and skill and the blood, sweat and tears that she obviously spent in mastering her craft as well as her general “BADASSERY.”

I refuse to congratulate her based on the color of her skin. Personally, I believe that this belittles her accomplishment.

QUICK: Someone name the first White person to master some skill or activity that Black people invented? Oh…that’s right. No one cares.

Actually, many people complain when White people co-opt or borrow some non-White cultural dance, music or other cultural talent, skill or development. (21 April 2015 Edit: Now they’re calling this #CulturalAppropriation. However, it seems to be cultural appropriation if a White person does something that Black people did such as a hairstyle or hip hop dancing/music.)

So a Black woman excels at Ballet. Awesome! But should I really congratulate her because she was Black or because she dances beautifully and her talent takes the breath away.  Can’t I simply appreciate that she is a beautifully skilled human being?

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#IdiotAmerica

RACISM: The Question is Always Skewed

“Hidden Colors” — a documentary series about the cultural history of African Americans, identity and race in America — recently released the trailer for it’s third installment, “The Rules Of Racism.” And it looks good. The project features various speakers from scholars to entertainment vets like Nas, KRS-ONE, and Paul Mooney who begs the question: ‘whites have always done whatever they wanted to black people, so what are the rules?'”

How is that question not, in and of itself, racist?

“[W]hites have always done whatever they wanted to black people, so what are the rules?”

Whites or White People is a subject that apparently enthralls some Black people.  The obvious answer to your question:  THERE ARE NO RULES!

You aren’t dealing with “Whites” or “White people” because “Whites” do not all hate Black people as a group or even care about race.   There are millions of “Whites” out there who really don’t care that you are Black or “not White.”  The assumption that Black people are dealing with “Whites” when they are confronted with racism IS RACIST.  The Black person wo makes this assumption is assuming that all White people act as one group.  This person assumes that all “Whites” are racist when approaching the subject of racism from that erroneous angle.  This is inherently racist.  For what is racism?

 

From Wikipedia:

Racism is actions, practices or beliefs, or social or political systems that consider different races to be ranked as inherently superior or inferior to each other, based on presumed shared inheritable traits, abilities, or qualities. It may also hold that members of different races should be treated differently.[1][2][3] While most conceptualizations of racism include the notion of “race based discrimination”, the exact definition is controversial both because there is little scholarly agreement about the meaning of the concept “race”, and because there is also little agreement about what does and does not constitute discrimination.

Some definitions consider that any assumption that a person’s behavior would be influenced by their racial categorization is inherently racist, regardless of whether the action is intentionally harmful or pejorative, because stereotyping necessarily subordinates individual identity to group identity. In sociology and psychology, many definitions only include consciously malignant forms of discrimination.

However one view distinguishes prejudice from racism, holding that racism is best understood as ‘prejudice plus power’ because without the support of political or economic power, prejudice would not be able to manifest as a pervasive cultural, institutional or social phenomenon.[6] [7] Among the questions about how to define racism are the question of whether to include forms of discrimination that are unintentional, such as making assumptions about preferences or abilities of others based on racial stereotypes, whether to include symbolic or institutionalized forms of discrimination such as the circulation of ethnic stereotypes through the media, and whether to include the socio-political dynamics of social stratification that sometimes have a racial component. Some definitions of racism also include discriminatory behaviors and beliefs based on cultural, national, ethnic, caste, or religious stereotypes.[2][8] Some critics of the term argue that the term is applied differentially, with a focus on such prejudices by whites, and in ways that define mere observations of any possible differences between races as racism.

 

 

 

I’ll lay it out for those who need the obvious explained to them.  Racists are individuals.  There are no group rules when dealing with individuals.  Each individual must be approached as such.  White people are simply a group of folks who have been arbitrarily grouped together based upon the superficial characteristic of their skin color.  White people do not have power over Black people.  Individual White persons may have the power to shape public or group action in such a way as to negatively affect Black people.  However, Black people such as Oprah Winfrey, Condoleeza Rice and Barack Obama also exist and have these same powers of influence.

Want to know what automatically turns me off to the subject of racism.  It is the exact moment when an ignorant bigot such as Paul Mooney or Al Sharpton, who are obviously racist themselves, begin to talk about “White people” as if we all have the exact same opinions and as if we all act in concert against all Black people.

Racism in America began as an act of asserting power or authority over a minority group.  Racism and it’s partner bigotry has affected every immigrant group which has traveled to America.  That includes Germans, Jews, Italians, Polish, Chinese, Cambodians, Vietnamese, Cubans and continues with today’s bigotry directed against Latin American groups and all Muslim groups.  Black people are not alone in having been victims of racism and bigotry.

Another complete misnomer is the idea that racism is unique to America.  Racism and Bigotry exist the world over.  Where there are differences in human groups and those groups are vying for power, there is racism and bigotry.  This includes Africa.  Africa is a hotbed of racism and bigotry based on everything from tribal affiliation to religion, ethnicity and nose length.

A major issue with the racial conversation in America is that it is rife with ignorance and myth.  I’ll close with this bit of advice to folks like Paul Mooney:  WHITES are not racist.  WHITES have not always done what they want with Black people.  If you want an honest conversation, do not begin with the premise that ALL WHITES are racist.  It is an accusation.  It is designed to alienate.  It does alienate.

If you want to have an honest and civil discourse about racism in America, it cannot begin with bigoted assumptions.  As soon as you start accusing ALL WHITES of being in control or being racists or bigots or even White, you have become yourself racist and bigoted.

Bigotry and racism will not solve racism and bigotry.  Hate will not lead to understanding.

I grew up with Black people.  I have always lived, worked, played and partied with Black people.  The only time that I think of them as Black people is when some hateful person such as Paul Mooney opens his mouth to remind me that I’m White and they’re Black.  The rest of the time, I think of them as Tyrone, Grover, Will, Frank, Tony, Mark, Rodney, JJ, George, McKinley, Greg, Katrina, She’Keena and Dorian.

I am fortunate to have traveled the world and to have befriended persons from all over this magnificent globe.  I am fortunate to have been able to have bridged the divides that only a person such as Paul Mooney could possibly create for me.  I am fortunate to have lived a life within which the only racial barriers which I have encountered were created from without.  The only way to end racism is to erase race as a possibility.  It is to see each individual based upon their individual merits and to be blind to superficialities such as skin color, nose width/length and hair texture.  If we wish not to be judged based upon the color of our skin, we cannot achieve this by judging all others based upon the color of their skin.  It is character, not color or toe length, that matters.

 

 

Equality

Gratuitous Sex to lure visitors

Gratuitous Sex to lure visitors

I can call out a white male on any issue. I can call a white male “the original ape” as Lincoln was called by Seward in the 1860 election. I can disagree with a white male on any issue. I have the freedom to say anything about a white male and I have the freedom to disagree with a while male on any issue. I can even NOT capitalize “white” and “male” and not be called a bigot or a racist.

However, if I disagree with a Black Male, I’m a racist. If I were to call a Black Male “the original Ape,” I would be crucified.  If I disagree with a Female of any race, I’m automatically termed a bigot, a misogynist or a sexist.  God help me if I were to call a Black Female “the original Ape.” The firestorm of controversy would force me to flee America.

This is unfortunate. I know many capable persons who are neither white nor male. Yet, I fear for my freedom if I vote for these persons or they are elected to office. One cannot question a person who is neither white nor male.  It is simply not done. One must simply genuflect and nod in gracious, absentminded servility.

If Obama were to pronounce the sky green, the Left would hail his brilliance and anyone who dared disagree would be called a racist.

This, apparently, is equality.

A Brief for Whitey by Pat Buchanan (updated 3 Apr 08)

How would Barack explain to his press groupies why he sat silent in a pew for 20 years as the Rev. Jeremiah Wright delivered racist rants against white America for our maligning of Fidel and Gadhafi, and inventing AIDS to infect and kill black people?

How would he justify not walking out as Wright spewed his venom about “the U.S. of K.K.K. America,” and howled, “God damn America!” My hunch was right. Barack would turn the tables.

Yes, Barack agreed, Wright’s statements were “controversial,” and “divisive,” and “racially charged,” reflecting a “distorted view of America.”

But we must understand the man in full and the black experience out of which the Rev. Wright came: 350 years of slavery and segregation.

Barack then listed black grievances and informed us what white America must do to close the racial divide and heal the country.

The “white community,” said Barack, must start “acknowledging that what ails the African-American community does not just exist in the minds of black people; that the legacy of discrimination — and current incidents of discrimination, while less overt than in the past — are real and must be addressed. Not just with words, but with deeds … .”

And what deeds must we perform to heal ourselves and our country?

The “white community” must invest more money in black schools and communities, enforce civil rights laws, ensure fairness in the criminal justice system and provide this generation of blacks with “ladders of opportunity” that were “unavailable” to Barack’s and the Rev. Wright’s generations.

What is wrong with Barack’s prognosis and Barack’s cure?

Only this. It is the same old con, the same old shakedown that black hustlers have been running since the Kerner Commission blamed the riots in Harlem, Watts, Newark, Detroit and a hundred other cities on, as Nixon put it, “everybody but the rioters themselves.”

Was “white racism” really responsible for those black men looting auto dealerships and liquor stories, and burning down their own communities, as Otto Kerner said — that liberal icon until the feds put him away for bribery.

Barack says we need to have a conversation about race in America.

Fair enough. But this time, it has to be a two-way conversation. White America needs to be heard from, not just lectured to.

This time, the Silent Majority needs to have its convictions, grievances and demands heard. And among them are these:

First, America has been the best country on earth for black folks. It was here that 600,000 black people, brought from Africa in slave ships, grew into a community of 40 million, were introduced to Christian salvation, and reached the greatest levels of freedom and prosperity blacks have ever known.

Wright ought to go down on his knees and thank God he is an American.

Second, no people anywhere has done more to lift up blacks than white Americans. Untold trillions have been spent since the ’60s on welfare, food stamps, rent supplements, Section 8 housing, Pell grants, student loans, legal services, Medicaid, Earned Income Tax Credits and poverty programs designed to bring the African-American community into the mainstream.

Governments, businesses and colleges have engaged in discrimination against white folks — with affirmative action, contract set-asides and quotas — to advance black applicants over white applicants.

Churches, foundations, civic groups, schools and individuals all over America have donated time and money to support soup kitchens, adult education, day care, retirement and nursing homes for blacks.

We hear the grievances. Where is the gratitude?

Barack talks about new “ladders of opportunity” for blacks.

Let him go to Altoona and Johnstown, and ask the white kids in Catholic schools how many were visited lately by Ivy League recruiters handing out scholarships for “deserving” white kids.

Is white America really responsible for the fact that the crime and incarceration rates for African-Americans are seven times those of white America? Is it really white America’s fault that illegitimacy in the African-American community has hit 70 percent and the black dropout rate from high schools in some cities has reached 50 percent?

Is that the fault of white America or, first and foremost, a failure of the black community itself?

As for racism, its ugliest manifestation is in interracial crime, and especially interracial crimes of violence. Is Barack Obama aware that while white criminals choose black victims 3 percent of the time, black criminals choose white victims 45 percent of the time?

Is Barack aware that black-on-white rapes are 100 times more common than the reverse, that black-on-white robberies were 139 times as common in the first three years of this decade as the reverse?

We have all heard ad nauseam from the Rev. Al about Tawana Brawley, the Duke rape case and Jena. And all turned out to be hoaxes. But about the epidemic of black assaults on whites that are real, we hear nothing.

Sorry, Barack, some of us have heard it all before, about 40 years and 40 trillion tax dollars ago.


Mr. Buchanan is a nationally syndicated columnist and author of “The Death of the West,” “The Great Betrayal,” “A Republic, Not an Empire” and “Where the Right Went Wrong.__________________________________________

My opinion is now and will always be that about 80% of the Independents and fully 100% of Liberals voting for Obama are doing so out of “White Guilt.” Barack Obambi is a continuous line of empty slogans.

“Hope”

“We can change.”

Yeah, he hopes America can change his address to that big old White House on Pennsylvania Avenue. That’s about as far as the empty suit that is Barack Obama has thought it out. Once he gets there. There is the HOPE that his inexperience and Carter like Bambi in the Woods inexperience won’t drive America further into the abyss.

Obambi is nothing more than an inexperienced babe in the woods surrounded by sharks awaiting the feeding frenzy that will be his Presidency.

McCain is the way to go. Looking back, he should be closing out his second term with Colin Powell running as the incumbent VP Candidate for the GOP. Let’s not launch another term of lunatic career mistakes.

McCain is the way to go.

Barack Obama — I’m here because of Ashley.

A More Perfect Union

“We the people, in order to form a more perfect union.”

Two hundred and twenty one years ago, in a hall that still stands across the street, a group of men gathered and, with these simple words, launched America’s improbable experiment in democracy. Farmers and scholars; statesmen and patriots who had traveled across an ocean to escape tyranny and persecution finally made real their declaration of independence at a Philadelphia convention that lasted through the spring of 1787.

The document they produced was eventually signed but ultimately unfinished. It was stained by this nation’s original sin of slavery, a question that divided the colonies and brought the convention to a stalemate until the founders chose to allow the slave trade to continue for at least twenty more years, and to leave any final resolution to future generations.

Of course, the answer to the slavery question was already embedded within our Constitution – a Constitution that had at is very core the ideal of equal citizenship under the law; a Constitution that promised its people liberty, and justice, and a union that could be and should be perfected over time.

And yet words on a parchment would not be enough to deliver slaves from bondage, or provide men and women of every color and creed their full rights and obligations as citizens of the United States. What would be needed were Americans in successive generations who were willing to do their part – through protests and struggle, on the streets and in the courts, through a civil war and civil disobedience and always at great risk – to narrow that gap between the promise of our ideals and the reality of their time.

This was one of the tasks we set forth at the beginning of this campaign – to continue the long march of those who came before us, a march for a more just, more equal, more free, more caring and more prosperous America. I chose to run for the presidency at this moment in history because I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction – towards a better future for of children and our grandchildren.

This belief comes from my unyielding faith in the decency and generosity of the American people. But it also comes from my own American story.

I am the son of a black man from Kenya and a white woman from Kansas. I was raised with the help of a white grandfather who survived a Depression to serve in Patton’s Army during World War II and a white grandmother who worked on a bomber assembly line at Fort Leavenworth while he was overseas. I’ve gone to some of the best schools in America and lived in one of the world’s poorest nations. I am married to a black American who carries within her the blood of slaves and slaveowners – an inheritance we pass on to our two precious daughters. I have brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, uncles and cousins, of every race and every hue, scattered across three continents, and for as long as I live, I will never forget that in no other country on Earth is my story even possible.

It’s a story that hasn’t made me the most conventional candidate. But it is a story that has seared into my genetic makeup the idea that this nation is more than the sum of its parts – that out of many, we are truly one.

Throughout the first year of this campaign, against all predictions to the contrary, we saw how hungry the American people were for this message of unity. Despite the temptation to view my candidacy through a purely racial lens, we won commanding victories in states with some of the whitest populations in the country. In South Carolina, where the Confederate Flag still flies, we built a powerful coalition of African Americans and white Americans.

This is not to say that race has not been an issue in the campaign. At various stages in the campaign, some commentators have deemed me either “too black” or “not black enough.” We saw racial tensions bubble to the surface during the week before the South Carolina primary. The press has scoured every exit poll for the latest evidence of racial polarization, not just in terms of white and black, but black and brown as well.

And yet, it has only been in the last couple of weeks that the discussion of race in this campaign has taken a particularly divisive turn.

On one end of the spectrum, we’ve heard the implication that my candidacy is somehow an exercise in affirmative action; that it’s based solely on the desire of wide-eyed liberals to purchase racial reconciliation on the cheap. On the other end, we’ve heard my former pastor, Reverend Jeremiah Wright, use incendiary language to express views that have the potential not only to widen the racial divide, but views that denigrate both the greatness and the goodness of our nation; that rightly offend white and black alike.

I have already condemned, in unequivocal terms, the statements of Reverend Wright that have caused such controversy. For some, nagging questions remain. Did I know him to be an occasionally fierce critic of American domestic and foreign policy? Of course. Did I ever hear him make remarks that could be considered controversial while I sat in church? Yes. Did I strongly disagree with many of his political views? Absolutely – just as I’m sure many of you have heard remarks from your pastors, priests, or rabbis with which you strongly disagreed.

But the remarks that have caused this recent firestorm weren’t simply controversial. They weren’t simply a religious leader’s effort to speak out against perceived injustice. Instead, they expressed a profoundly distorted view of this country – a view that sees white racism as endemic, and that elevates what is wrong with America above all that we know is right with America; a view that sees the conflicts in the Middle East as rooted primarily in the actions of stalwart allies like Israel, instead of emanating from the perverse and hateful ideologies of radical Islam.

As such, Reverend Wright’s comments were not only wrong but divisive, divisive at a time when we need unity; racially charged at a time when we need to come together to solve a set of monumental problems – two wars, a terrorist threat, a falling economy, a chronic health care crisis and potentially devastating climate change; problems that are neither black or white or Latino or Asian, but rather problems that confront us all.

Given my background, my politics, and my professed values and ideals, there will no doubt be those for whom my statements of condemnation are not enough. Why associate myself with Reverend Wright in the first place, they may ask? Why not join another church? And I confess that if all that I knew of Reverend Wright were the snippets of those sermons that have run in an endless loop on the television and You Tube, or if Trinity United Church of Christ conformed to the caricatures being peddled by some commentators, there is no doubt that I would react in much the same way

But the truth is, that isn’t all that I know of the man. The man I met more than twenty years ago is a man who helped introduce me to my Christian faith, a man who spoke to me about our obligations to love one another; to care for the sick and lift up the poor. He is a man who served his country as a U.S. Marine; who has studied and lectured at some of the finest universities and seminaries in the country, and who for over thirty years led a church that serves the community by doing God’s work here on Earth – by housing the homeless, ministering to the needy, providing day care services and scholarships and prison ministries, and reaching out to those suffering from HIV/AIDS.

In my first book, Dreams From My Father, I described the experience of my first service at Trinity:

“People began to shout, to rise from their seats and clap and cry out, a forceful wind carrying the reverend’s voice up into the rafters….And in that single note – hope! – I heard something else; at the foot of that cross, inside the thousands of churches across the city, I imagined the stories of ordinary black people merging with the stories of David and Goliath, Moses and Pharaoh, the Christians in the lion’s den, Ezekiel’s field of dry bones. Those stories – of survival, and freedom, and hope – became our story, my story; the blood that had spilled was our blood, the tears our tears; until this black church, on this bright day, seemed once more a vessel carrying the story of a people into future generations and into a larger world. Our trials and triumphs became at once unique and universal, black and more than black; in chronicling our journey, the stories and songs gave us a means to reclaim memories that we didn’t need to feel shame about…memories that all people might study and cherish – and with which we could start to rebuild.”

That has been my experience at Trinity. Like other predominantly black churches across the country, Trinity embodies the black community in its entirety – the doctor and the welfare mom, the model student and the former gang-banger. Like other black churches, Trinity’s services are full of raucous laughter and sometimes bawdy humor. They are full of dancing, clapping, screaming and shouting that may seem jarring to the untrained ear. The church contains in full the kindness and cruelty, the fierce intelligence and the shocking ignorance, the struggles and successes, the love and yes, the bitterness and bias that make up the black experience in America.

And this helps explain, perhaps, my relationship with Reverend Wright. As imperfect as he may be, he has been like family to me. He strengthened my faith, officiated my wedding, and baptized my children. Not once in my conversations with him have I heard him talk about any ethnic group in derogatory terms, or treat whites with whom he interacted with anything but courtesy and respect. He contains within him the contradictions – the good and the bad – of the community that he has served diligently for so many years.

I can no more disown him than I can disown the black community. I can no more disown him than I can my white grandmother – a woman who helped raise me, a woman who sacrificed again and again for me, a woman who loves me as much as she loves anything in this world, but a woman who once confessed her fear of black men who passed by her on the street, and who on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe.

These people are a part of me. And they are a part of America, this country that I love.

Some will see this as an attempt to justify or excuse comments that are simply inexcusable. I can assure you it is not. I suppose the politically safe thing would be to move on from this episode and just hope that it fades into the woodwork. We can dismiss Reverend Wright as a crank or a demagogue, just as some have dismissed Geraldine Ferraro, in the aftermath of her recent statements, as harboring some deep-seated racial bias.

But race is an issue that I believe this nation cannot afford to ignore right now. We would be making the same mistake that Reverend Wright made in his offending sermons about America – to simplify and stereotype and amplify the negative to the point that it distorts reality.

The fact is that the comments that have been made and the issues that have surfaced over the last few weeks reflect the complexities of race in this country that we’ve never really worked through – a part of our union that we have yet to perfect. And if we walk away now, if we simply retreat into our respective corners, we will never be able to come together and solve challenges like health care, or education, or the need to find good jobs for every American.

Understanding this reality requires a reminder of how we arrived at this point. As William Faulkner once wrote, “The past isn’t dead and buried. In fact, it isn’t even past.” We do not need to recite here the history of racial injustice in this country. But we do need to remind ourselves that so many of the disparities that exist in the African-American community today can be directly traced to inequalities passed on from an earlier generation that suffered under the brutal legacy of slavery and Jim Crow.

Segregated schools were, and are, inferior schools; we still haven’t fixed them, fifty years after Brown v. Board of Education, and the inferior education they provided, then and now, helps explain the pervasive achievement gap between today’s black and white students.

Legalized discrimination – where blacks were prevented, often through violence, from owning property, or loans were not granted to African-American business owners, or black homeowners could not access FHA mortgages, or blacks were excluded from unions, or the police force, or fire departments – meant that black families could not amass any meaningful wealth to bequeath to future generations. That history helps explain the wealth and income gap between black and white, and the concentrated pockets of poverty that persists in so many of today’s urban and rural communities.

A lack of economic opportunity among black men, and the shame and frustration that came from not being able to provide for one’s family, contributed to the erosion of black families – a problem that welfare policies for many years may have worsened. And the lack of basic services in so many urban black neighborhoods – parks for kids to play in, police walking the beat, regular garbage pick-up and building code enforcement – all helped create a cycle of violence, blight and neglect that continue to haunt us.

This is the reality in which Reverend Wright and other African-Americans of his generation grew up. They came of age in the late fifties and early sixties, a time when segregation was still the law of the land and opportunity was systematically constricted. What’s remarkable is not how many failed in the face of discrimination, but rather how many men and women overcame the odds; how many were able to make a way out of no way for those like me who would come after them.

But for all those who scratched and clawed their way to get a piece of the American Dream, there were many who didn’t make it – those who were ultimately defeated, in one way or another, by discrimination. That legacy of defeat was passed on to future generations – those young men and increasingly young women who we see standing on street corners or languishing in our prisons, without hope or prospects for the future. Even for those blacks who did make it, questions of race, and racism, continue to define their worldview in fundamental ways. For the men and women of Reverend Wright’s generation, the memories of humiliation and doubt and fear have not gone away; nor has the anger and the bitterness of those years. That anger may not get expressed in public, in front of white co-workers or white friends. But it does find voice in the barbershop or around the kitchen table. At times, that anger is exploited by politicians, to gin up votes along racial lines, or to make up for a politician’s own failings.

And occasionally it finds voice in the church on Sunday morning, in the pulpit and in the pews. The fact that so many people are surprised to hear that anger in some of Reverend Wright’s sermons simply reminds us of the old truism that the most segregated hour in American life occurs on Sunday morning. That anger is not always productive; indeed, all too often it distracts attention from solving real problems; it keeps us from squarely facing our own complicity in our condition, and prevents the African-American community from forging the alliances it needs to bring about real change. But the anger is real; it is powerful; and to simply wish it away, to condemn it without understanding its roots, only serves to widen the chasm of misunderstanding that exists between the races.

In fact, a similar anger exists within segments of the white community. Most working- and middle-class white Americans don’t feel that they have been particularly privileged by their race. Their experience is the immigrant experience – as far as they’re concerned, no one’s handed them anything, they’ve built it from scratch. They’ve worked hard all their lives, many times only to see their jobs shipped overseas or their pension dumped after a lifetime of labor. They are anxious about their futures, and feel their dreams slipping away; in an era of stagnant wages and global competition, opportunity comes to be seen as a zero sum game, in which your dreams come at my expense. So when they are told to bus their children to a school across town; when they hear that an African American is getting an advantage in landing a good job or a spot in a good college because of an injustice that they themselves never committed; when they’re told that their fears about crime in urban neighborhoods are somehow prejudiced, resentment builds over time.

Like the anger within the black community, these resentments aren’t always expressed in polite company. But they have helped shape the political landscape for at least a generation. Anger over welfare and affirmative action helped forge the Reagan Coalition. Politicians routinely exploited fears of crime for their own electoral ends. Talk show hosts and conservative commentators built entire careers unmasking bogus claims of racism while dismissing legitimate discussions of racial injustice and inequality as mere political correctness or reverse racism.

Just as black anger often proved counterproductive, so have these white resentments distracted attention from the real culprits of the middle class squeeze – a corporate culture rife with inside dealing, questionable accounting practices, and short-term greed; a Washington dominated by lobbyists and special interests; economic policies that favor the few over the many. And yet, to wish away the resentments of white Americans, to label them as misguided or even racist, without recognizing they are grounded in legitimate concerns – this too widens the racial divide, and blocks the path to understanding.

This is where we are right now. It’s a racial stalemate we’ve been stuck in for years. Contrary to the claims of some of my critics, black and white, I have never been so naïve as to believe that we can get beyond our racial divisions in a single election cycle, or with a single candidacy – particularly a candidacy as imperfect as my own.

But I have asserted a firm conviction – a conviction rooted in my faith in God and my faith in the American people – that working together we can move beyond some of our old racial wounds, and that in fact we have no choice is we are to continue on the path of a more perfect union.

For the African-American community, that path means embracing the burdens of our past without becoming victims of our past. It means continuing to insist on a full measure of justice in every aspect of American life. But it also means binding our particular grievances – for better health care, and better schools, and better jobs – to the larger aspirations of all Americans — the white woman struggling to break the glass ceiling, the white man whose been laid off, the immigrant trying to feed his family. And it means taking full responsibility for own lives – by demanding more from our fathers, and spending more time with our children, and reading to them, and teaching them that while they may face challenges and discrimination in their own lives, they must never succumb to despair or cynicism; they must always believe that they can write their own destiny.

Ironically, this quintessentially American – and yes, conservative – notion of self-help found frequent expression in Reverend Wright’s sermons. But what my former pastor too often failed to understand is that embarking on a program of self-help also requires a belief that society can change.

The profound mistake of Reverend Wright’s sermons is not that he spoke about racism in our society. It’s that he spoke as if our society was static; as if no progress has been made; as if this country – a country that has made it possible for one of his own members to run for the highest office in the land and build a coalition of white and black; Latino and Asian, rich and poor, young and old — is still irrevocably bound to a tragic past. But what we know — what we have seen – is that America can change. That is true genius of this nation. What we have already achieved gives us hope – the audacity to hope – for what we can and must achieve tomorrow.

In the white community, the path to a more perfect union means acknowledging that what ails the African-American community does not just exist in the minds of black people; that the legacy of discrimination – and current incidents of discrimination, while less overt than in the past – are real and must be addressed. Not just with words, but with deeds – by investing in our schools and our communities; by enforcing our civil rights laws and ensuring fairness in our criminal justice system; by providing this generation with ladders of opportunity that were unavailable for previous generations. It requires all Americans to realize that your dreams do not have to come at the expense of my dreams; that investing in the health, welfare, and education of black and brown and white children will ultimately help all of America prosper.

In the end, then, what is called for is nothing more, and nothing less, than what all the world’s great religions demand – that we do unto others as we would have them do unto us. Let us be our brother’s keeper, Scripture tells us. Let us be our sister’s keeper. Let us find that common stake we all have in one another, and let our politics reflect that spirit as well.

For we have a choice in this country. We can accept a politics that breeds division, and conflict, and cynicism. We can tackle race only as spectacle – as we did in the OJ trial – or in the wake of tragedy, as we did in the aftermath of Katrina – or as fodder for the nightly news. We can play Reverend Wright’s sermons on every channel, every day and talk about them from now until the election, and make the only question in this campaign whether or not the American people think that I somehow believe or sympathize with his most offensive words. We can pounce on some gaffe by a Hillary supporter as evidence that she’s playing the race card, or we can speculate on whether white men will all flock to John McCain in the general election regardless of his policies.

We can do that.

But if we do, I can tell you that in the next election, we’ll be talking about some other distraction. And then another one. And then another one. And nothing will change.

That is one option. Or, at this moment, in this election, we can come together and say, “Not this time.” This time we want to talk about the crumbling schools that are stealing the future of black children and white children and Asian children and Hispanic children and Native American children. This time we want to reject the cynicism that tells us that these kids can’t learn; that those kids who don’t look like us are somebody else’s problem. The children of America are not those kids, they are our kids, and we will not let them fall behind in a 21st century economy. Not this time.

This time we want to talk about how the lines in the Emergency Room are filled with whites and blacks and Hispanics who do not have health care; who don’t have the power on their own to overcome the special interests in Washington, but who can take them on if we do it together.

This time we want to talk about the shuttered mills that once provided a decent life for men and women of every race, and the homes for sale that once belonged to Americans from every religion, every region, every walk of life. This time we want to talk about the fact that the real problem is not that someone who doesn’t look like you might take your job; it’s that the corporation you work for will ship it overseas for nothing more than a profit.

This time we want to talk about the men and women of every color and creed who serve together, and fight together, and bleed together under the same proud flag. We want to talk about how to bring them home from a war that never should’ve been authorized and never should’ve been waged, and we want to talk about how we’ll show our patriotism by caring for them, and their families, and giving them the benefits they have earned.

I would not be running for President if I didn’t believe with all my heart that this is what the vast majority of Americans want for this country. This union may never be perfect, but generation after generation has shown that it can always be perfected. And today, whenever I find myself feeling doubtful or cynical about this possibility, what gives me the most hope is the next generation – the young people whose attitudes and beliefs and openness to change have already made history in this election.

There is one story in particularly that I’d like to leave you with today – a story I told when I had the great honor of speaking on Dr. King’s birthday at his home church, Ebenezer Baptist, in Atlanta.

There is a young, twenty-three year old white woman named Ashley Baia who organized for our campaign in Florence, South Carolina. She had been working to organize a mostly African-American community since the beginning of this campaign, and one day she was at a roundtable discussion where everyone went around telling their story and why they were there.

And Ashley said that when she was nine years old, her mother got cancer. And because she had to miss days of work, she was let go and lost her health care. They had to file for bankruptcy, and that’s when Ashley decided that she had to do something to help her mom.

She knew that food was one of their most expensive costs, and so Ashley convinced her mother that what she really liked and really wanted to eat more than anything else was mustard and relish sandwiches. Because that was the cheapest way to eat.

She did this for a year until her mom got better, and she told everyone at the roundtable that the reason she joined our campaign was so that she could help the millions of other children in the country who want and need to help their parents too.

Now Ashley might have made a different choice. Perhaps somebody told her along the way that the source of her mother’s problems were blacks who were on welfare and too lazy to work, or Hispanics who were coming into the country illegally. But she didn’t. She sought out allies in her fight against injustice.

Anyway, Ashley finishes her story and then goes around the room and asks everyone else why they’re supporting the campaign. They all have different stories and reasons. Many bring up a specific issue. And finally they come to this elderly black man who’s been sitting there quietly the entire time. And Ashley asks him why he’s there. And he does not bring up a specific issue. He does not say health care or the economy. He does not say education or the war. He does not say that he was there because of Barack Obama. He simply says to everyone in the room, “I am here because of Ashley.”

“I’m here because of Ashley.” By itself, that single moment of recognition between that young white girl and that old black man is not enough. It is not enough to give health care to the sick, or jobs to the jobless, or education to our children.

But it is where we start. It is where our union grows stronger. And as so many generations have come to realize over the course of the two-hundred and twenty one years since a band of patriots signed that document in Philadelphia, that is where the perfection begins.

____________________________________________________________

Putting aside the fact the he is a Democrat and I distrust his intent or abilities as concerns foreign policy, it was a good speech. It touches on basic truths of American life. It was fair. I like that he didn’t throw Rev. Wright under the bus even as he disagreed with the nature of his remarks. I like that he sees or seems to see the issue of Race from many angles. It’s a good speech. I think it will be an important speech in American History no matter the outcome of this election.