Video

Somewhere in America (Westernized Muslim Women and Hijab Pride)

These are Muslim women who do not understand Islam and the meaning behind the hijab. The hijab is humility and chasteness. There is nothing humble or chaste about most of the women in this video.

The hijab, chadori and other Islamic accoutrement that these women are wearing are nothing more than an expression of their being from an Islamic culture. It is not an understanding of Islam or a representation of their Islamic beliefs.

These women have a choice, obviously, as to how they wish to live their lives. let them go to Saudi Arabia and prance around as they do in this video. That would be an excellent and hard lesson for them in the realities of Islam.

American Muslims are, apparently, no longer Muslims. They’ve lost their “Islam.” lol Muslims in name only. haha

This video is not a vision of reality for Muslim women in the Muslim world. It is an expression of Women who grew up Muslim in the West and, apparently, in extremely liberal Muslim families. This would not be possible in most of the Islamic world.

Body fitting pants and a hijab are as compatible as liberty and slavery. One may as well be a Nun and wear a bikini.

This video says nothing except that Muslim women in America do not to understand Islam or the realities of Muslim women in Muslim countries. The Hijab, the Chadori and other Muslim clothing articles of this type are meant to convey a sense of humility before Allah. They are meant to be a sign that the woman or girl is chaste. These women almost universally wear curve revealing clothing. This completely negates the head coverings that they’re wearing.

I challenge any of them to move to Iran, Lebanon, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Afghanistan, Pakistan. Live for a year or two in Egypt or Turkey or many other traditionally Muslim countries outside of the larger Metropolitan areas such as Cairo. Try dressing their as they dress in America. Experiment with going out in public without their hair covered. After that, then come back and tell us how free you felt to dress as you please.

Muslim women outside of the Muslim world have fooled themselves into believing that they have choices. They have fooled themselves into believing that if they wear the hijab that they are good Muslims.

Reality would beat these girls and throw acid in their face almost anywhere outside of the West.

Enjoy those freedoms but understand that you have those freedoms because you DO NOT live in a Muslim society.

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Muslim Woman Raise Your Voices! Be Heard! Fight!

https://i2.wp.com/blog.lib.umn.edu/raim0007/RaeSpot/1_lil-kim-burqa.jpg

The French legislators who seek to repudiate the wearing of the veil or the burqa—whether the garment covers “only” the face or the entire female body—are often described as seeking to impose a “ban.” To the contrary, they are attempting to lift a ban: a ban on the right of women to choose their own dress, a ban on the right of women to disagree with male and clerical authority, and a ban on the right of all citizens to look one another in the face. The proposed law is in the best traditions of the French republic, which declares all citizens equal before the law and—no less important—equal in the face of one another.

It is way past time for the world to band together to take on this unjust tradition.

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Could anything be more obvious and yet so ignored a danger to women of this world as this despotic, idiotic religious/ethnic tradition?

Burqa, Burqa, Mohammad, Hijab!

The dumbest bit of fabric ever devised by an evil group of patriarchal assholes!

For these woman, like the women in Afghanistan and other countries where the rights of girls and women are being stripped away under the pretext of religious piety, feminism is a life and death matter. A spectacular example is the life and near-death of Malalai Joya.

She had committed no crime, had set up an orphanage and a health centre, been elected to parliament, but for her affront to the dignity of the new male-dominated institutions, for calling it a sanctuary for “warlords and theocrats” and comparing it to a zoo, she was thrown out of office by a majority vote of parliament, threatened with death, abandoned by the government, forced to move from safe house to safe house. She has survived two assassination attempts.

She is also banned from flying. To get to Australia she had to leave home under the all-enveloping burqa – a garment she describes as “disgusting” – travel by van to the Pakistan border, then by another van to a city in Pakistan, then fly to Bangkok, then to Sydney. The journey took almost three days. As the most outspoken woman in Afghanistan, she lives with the constant risk of murder.

On April 12 a leading Afghan feminist and member of the regional parliament in Kandahar, Sitara Achakzai, was abducted and then murdered by Taliban gunmen.

Any man who is for this bit of oppressive fabric is an uneducated lout and, most probably, a bigot.  Any woman who has a positive view of the burqa or hijab is a self hating, propaganda  laden soul who has no idea of her own potential as a human being.  God did not intend for half of humanity to be covered and marginalized or he’d have not blessed women with the intelligence that is so obviously present in their gender.

The UN and every other so called humanitarian organization should be ashamed of themselves for not doing all that they can to stamp out this stain  on human dignity.

Some Muslim women argue that they wear the hijab out of a desire to appear humble before God.  It is their personal beliefs that motivate them to wear the hijab (veil).  This is all good and well for those Muslim women who have a choice.   The problem is with the millions of poor, uneducated women who do not have the same choices and opportunities as these women.

On the other hand, we have the women in places like Afghanistan and the Sinai who are forced to wear the hijab and the burqa.  These women do not have a choice.  These women are subjugated by the medieval minds of men who have no respect for women and see them as only a vessel for their seed in the production of offspring.

It is all good and well that educated women from privileged backgrounds in the Middle East, other predominantly Islamic countries and the West have the choice as to whether to wear the hijab or not.  The unfortunate outcome of their donning the hijab, though, is that said decision is used by oppressive forces and backward, patriarchal madmen to enslave the minds and to physically oppress of millions of women in Central Asia, the Middle East and India.  These men use Islam, the hijab and the burqa as a means to keep their boot heals squarely across the neck of women in all of the lands of Islam.  To women who are forced to wear these garments, the hijab and the burqa are not a symbol of humility in the face of God, but, a symbol of systematic rape, oppression and violence.

Islam is like any other religion.  There exists both beauty and ugliness within the pages of all religious books.  Evil men and women pick and choose the verses and suras which back their decrepit and despotic philosophies in order to further their personal wealth and twisted designs.  Good men and women use those words and phrases from these books which advance the cause of humanity towards a better tomorrow.

Until all Muslim women have the freedom of choice to wear the hijab, I believe it is the duty of all peoples to take a stance against the use of the veil for ill intent.  This obligation is especially incumbent upon Muslim women whose Sisters in Islam are the primary victims of this particular form of oppression.  This is a choice that Muslim women have to make.  I agree that the hijab when it is worn in free choice is an idea of beauty.  Humility before God (for those who believe in these religions) is an appeal to the grace of humanity.  It is, indeed, a beautiful act.  The problem is that millions of men across the Muslim world use the hijab and the burqa not as an appeal to God but as a tool of personal power and in acts of narcissism and nihilism.  These acts are in direct contravention to the Qu’ran, the Bible and the will of God.  To deny or ignore these acts and the suffering of these women is to deny reality.  Muslim women must stand together on this issue.  The oppression of one is the oppression of all.

Lipstick Jihad — an excerpt

Our tears are sweet, our laughter venomous,
We’re pleased when sad, and sad when pleased,
We have broken every stalk, like a wind in the garden
We have picked clean the vine’s caldelabra
And if we found a tree, still standing, defiantly,
We cut it’s branches, we pulled it up by the roots.

—-Simin Behbehani

Lipstick Jihad is an excellent book about a womans journey back into her Iranian homeland.  Azedeh Moaveni was born in the States and raised amongst the Iranian diaspora caused by the Revolution in 1979.  Later, she returns to her home in Teheran to cover the Reformist movement at the turn of the century.  She writes about the challenges of living in Iran as an Iranian-American and the inner conflicts of dealing with the [sur]reality of Islamic Iran as juxtaposed against her familial and diaspora created memories of her homeland.  It’s a moving story told from a unique inside outsider perspective.

I’ve enjoyed reading the book.

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2005/03/lipstick-jihad-interview-azadeh-moaveni http://www.amazon.com/Lipstick-Jihad-Growing-Iranian-American/dp/1586481932 http://muslimahmediawatch.org/2008/10/lipstick-jihad/

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Last year some time, France banned the Burqa.  I agreed with this ruling wholeheartedly.  Some argued that France should not meddle in cultures and customs of the various immigrant peoples who inhabit their country.  Still others argued that the burqa and by extension the hijab or veil is part of the right to “freedom”  of speech a part of the expression of the culture of Islamic peoples.  I simply can not agree with this.

To me the hijab/veil and the burqa is a symbol of oppression.  It’s a relic of the patriarchal systems of our forefathers and a means of control.  It’s the tool used to enslave women.  We used similar tools of oppression here in the dark ages of the west.

These things and like items used to oppress people should be relegated to the dark past.  Discarded and forgotten for all time.

How would I feel if I were forced to wear similar tools of oppression.  What’s the difference between the hijab and the star of David which the Nazis forced on the Juden of 1930s era Germany?  What is the difference between this attitude and the attitudes of White Americans towards Blacks in the early 1900s in the Jim Crow Era of the South?

I see no difference.  Women in Iran are thrown in prison and tortured and raped for the simple offense of being seen in public with a non-relative male or showing too much ankle or for having the audacity to think and speak out.  They’re beaten on the streets for showing an inch too much of hair.  Young Men are brutalized by the basiji thugs for accompanying non-relative females from a Cafe to the curb to hail a taxi.

Do we excuse these behaviors in the name of cultural diversity?  Do we welcome this into our countries?  Do we allow this barbaric behavior into our neighborhoods?

I think we should not.

Someone will make the comment eventually; “So what do you want to do?  Invade Iran?”  That is not what this is about.

We can’t do anything about the barbarism of Islamic Sharia in Saudi Arabia or Iran.

However, we do have the choice of not tolerating it’s introduction into our own home countries.

I think that is where the world should make it’s stand.

I’m of the opinion that banning the burqa was not going far enough. The hijab should be banned as well.  Similar resolutions should be introduced in the UN to end this oppressive reign of terror on women.