The NBA Draft — Pitiful Edition 2013 (Kentucky)

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Poythress and Goodwin have really done damage to their draft stocks the past few weeks. Both were considered by scouts to be Top 10 picks before the season began. Poythress still clinging to the end of the lottery. Goodwin now out of it. Cauley-Stein flubbed his first game starting in place of Nerlens Noel. Scouts love the upside, but he’s going to have to produce to stay in the lottery.

It is one helluva a weak draft when either of these three guys are close to the lottery.
I can almost understand Willie Cauley-Stein because of his size.

Poythress and Goodwin?  What do they have? What have they shown? Well..aside from an ability to lose against anything resembling a competitive team?

Goodwin and Poythress remind of me of the Team Turmoil days of Carruth, Chiles and Parker.  Goodwin’s signature move is a rush to the rim and a toss in the air.  Where it lands, Goodwin don’t care!  Poythress is rumored to have stated that he doesn’t give a damn where he goes in the draft, he is not staying.  Apparently, Poythress is not happy with the efforts of a Team of Coaches who have had a run of NCAA Success and NBA Lottery Picks unlike any other program in NCAA History.  Poythress “knows” that he can do as he pleases and take 4/5ths of each game off and still be good to go.  He’ll still play ball….SOMEWHERE!!!  Where?  Apparently, he doesn’t care.  I’ll go with Europe as my guess.   Maybe Turkey or Israel.

Neither Goodwin nor Poythress will ever make it to a second contract in the NBA. NEVER.  If Poythress is selected in the Draft this year.  I doubt that he’ll survive his first year without long stints in the NBDL.  I wonder how he’ll feel about his College Ball when he’s in North Dakota or Bumfcuk, Indiana playing ball with other NBA rejects.

But they are both too ignorant to see what they are doing.  Both are too foolish (full of themselves) to realize that it’s the second contract and not the first that matters.

I still can’t believe that an NBA team would waste money on either of these two.  But I guess the NBA has to have losing teams as well as winning teams.  For the Great Talent to rise and be enjoyed fully, there have to be duds and chumps to sink to the bottom and show us how talent can be wasted.

Riffing on the NCAA and the NBA Age Restriction

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Why should one go to college?

Is it for the college experience? I’d say that’s the immature reason to go to college.

The reason that folks go to college or any school is to get training or a degree or some type of higher learning to prepare them for some kind of profession.

Basketball is a profession. Sure, it’s a short lived profession.

Nevertheless, it is a profession.

The NCAA should start treating it as such.

Students of the game should be allowed to maximize their instruction time. They should be allowed to learn their chosen profession.

Instead, the NCAA limits instruction in their chosen profession.

It would be like MIT telling mathematics or comp science/programming students that they can only dedicate certain periods/times to the study of mathematics or quantum physics or programming.

It’s all asinine.

If a kid, regardless of his financial situation, can go straight to the NBA out of HS, then they should be allowed to do so.

Kids can go straight to work for Humana or Google or Microsoft out of HS and make a 6 figure salary.

What’s the difference….????

Some kids need a couple more years.

That is where the NBA and the NCAA sit down and make some common sense rules.

A kid makes himself available for the draft. If he is drafted, his pay is deferred until he is evaluated. If he passes muster in the summer league, he stays. If not or if he goes undrafted, he goes back to college. Patrick Patterson could have benefitted from such an eval period. Orton would have. Meeks would have. Many players each year would benefit.

The Summer League and the Draft Process should be treated as an internship.

Legal Students do it. Damn near every other type of student does it.

The only reason that Collegiate Athletes in the Major Sports are given short shrift on this is so that the NCAA can call itself “amateur” and get a tax break. It’s all about the money. It has nothing to do with protecting the game, the sanctity of college sports or the fabled student athlete.

A program of instruction should be developed around each sport. Sports Management type academic program.

It’s not coddling the kids, it’s being realistic.

The way it is now, it’s a colossal waste of time for everyone involved.

While the owners want to do away with the soft salary cap and guaranteed contracts, the players hope to end the age restriction that forbids players from entering the NBA directly out of high school.

“We want to go back to the way it was,” a source from the National Basketball Players Association said. “The players have always been philosophically opposed to it. The vast majority of players feel a player should have the right to make a living. If he has the talent and wants to make money to help his family, he should have that right. It’s just a matter of principle.”

If you read this, let me know what you think?

Coach Calipari! Welcome to Kentucky Basketball!!!

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This is the best UK news since 1996 and 1998.

According to more sources than I can count, Coach Calipari IS the next Basketball Coach at the University of Kentucky.

WELCOME!

And may the Gods grant you TREMENDOUS SUCCESS and DOMINANCE over all you survey…

GO BIG BLUE!!!

I could not be happier with the way things have turned out.   This makes the past 4 years seem as if naught but a moment has passed.

UK is back!

I’ll say it again.

UK IS BACK!!!

GET READY.  Kentucky is going to start cuttin’ some nets!

Jay Bilas on why Calipari should go to UK

Kentucky on Cal’s Mind

Calipari, 252-69 in nine seasons at Memphis and 445-140 overall, was named the Sports Illustrated coach of the year before the start of the NCAA tournament, the first time he received SI’s award. Calipari was the Naismith coach of the year last season, joining Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski as the only coaches to be named twice to the award since its inception in 1987.

Calipari went 193-71 in eight seasons at Massachusetts from 1988 to 1996, culminating with an Elite Eight appearance in ’95 and a trip to the Final Four in ’96.

Calipari, a graduate of Clarion State (Pa.) in 1982, also coached the NBA’s New Jersey Nets from 1996 to ’98, going 72-112 before his ouster early in the 1998-99 season.

On John Calipari

Calipari attracts his own set of assumptions.

But he can absolutely coach. And in the two years since I wrote my last take on whether he should come to UK, he has shown that he can take a team to the elite level, and that he can attract some of the best talent in college basketball and craft a system in which that talent can thrive.

I suppose if you’re UK, the best case scenario is that Calipari can use the power of the program’s prestige to get in on the very best talent every year, and that the program’s in-place safeguards can ward off some of the less-savory assumptions, if not elements. You bank on the fact that the NCAA has not stuck anything on Calipari in his blindingly successful time in Memphis.

But you’d also better understand — those assumptions that follow Calipari, will now attach themselves to your program. Which, while among the most storied in college basketball, is also one of the most penalized in college basketball.

I suppose my bottom line is that I have more of an appreciation for Calipari as a coach than I had two years ago.

The reward — big-time success and exposure — is a given. But the spotlight at Kentucky is very bright. And if anything turns up in the glare, fans in Lexington need only cast a glance up to Bloomington to see the risks involved.

It’s still a risk for UK. But it appears to be a Cal-culated risk that UK may well be ready to take.

IT IS OFFICIAL!!!  COACH CAL is now Coach of the Big Blue Nation!

GO CATS!!!

GO BIG BLUE!!!

Take a moment and let me know how you feel about this hire.  I know I”m excited as hell.  And don’t worry.  No comment will be censored.  I’d just like to know how the BBN feels about the hire.

Peace, Dave

(reporting from Afghanistan.  lol)


Jodie Meeks: Breaks Dan Issels Record, Scores 54 at UT

“In any legitimate conversation right now about National Player of the Year, Jodie Meeks has to be metioned with the four or five guys we’ve been mentioning all along,” proclaimed ESPN hoops analyst Jimmy Dykes on the broadcast Tuesday night. He repeated the same sentiment via phone Wednesday.

“Jodie Meeks has to be there,” said Dykes. “You don’t base the National Player of the Year on just one game, you base it on the whole body of work. But the kid came in averaging over 24 points a game, the number five scorer in the country.”

Then Jodie flat blew the roof off the joint.

Jodie Meeks ripped through Thompson-Boling Arena this week like a snowstorm through the Mongolian Steppes.  He scored 54 points on the way to breaking Dan Issels single game scoring record that’s held for 39 years.  Absolutely amazing.  If that wasn’t enough, he did so while playing solid defense and keeping his team involved and kept UT out of their minds trying to defend him.

Tennessee coach Bruce Pearl said he worked with his players for several days trying to come up with a game plan to keep the ball out of Meeks’ hand.

To say it didn’t work is an understatement. Meeks went 10-for-15 from 3-point range (he also set a school record for 3s in a game), made all 14 of his free throws, grabbed eight rebounds and dished out four assists. He scored 26 points by halftime.

He was at 52 points and potentially let the record pass him by late in the game in order to garner one more assist by throwing an alley oop to a wide open Patrick Patterson.  He even apologized for taking the one bad shot of the night as the shot clock expired.  Running past the bench and Coach Gillispie stating “My bad, my fault.”

After the game, he was humble enough to tell the press that it was all due to the team and that what he really wanted was to get a win at UT.  The scoring record was not top on his mind.  Victory was.

My kind of guy.

Meeks has singlehandedly put UK back in the National Conversation.  If UK is ranked come the next poll, you can thank Jodie Meeks.

Coolest of all was that his father (and Uncle) were on hand to see the spectacular performance.  I’ve met both Jodie Meeks and his father.  Way back when they were visiting UK.  Prior to the commit, if I remember correctly.  I met them at the UK Bookstore with my friend Rick (WildCatRick of WCN).  You always meet interesting folks if you hang around Rick.  The Meeks are good people.  So someting like this is doubly awesome.  Because it’s happening to genuinely good folks.

Congrats to Jodie and his family.  It’s a hell of an achievement.  It was a game for the ages.  Legendary.  Jodie Meeks is now a part of UK lore right alongside Issel, Nash, Dampier, Riley, Kenny and Antoine Walker, Mashburn, Prince, Bowie, Chapman and Wah Wah Jones.  He’s in the Book.

And one last thing.  Thank You Jodie Meeks.  It was a pleasrue to watch you become legend.

Dan Issel Speaks…

But there is always a moron around who refuses to shut his pie hole.  Woody Paige, you get the vote this go around.

Wayne Chism bemoans UTs inability to stop Jodie Meeks…

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The Day After, Meeks Still Humble.

Meeks humbly told Issel he didn’t mean to break the record or even realize he was doing so. His only intention, he said, reiterating what he said after the game, was to finally knock off the rival Volunteers in Knoxville.

“It’s an honor to me,” Meeks said Wednesday. “I don’t see myself as being legendary or anything like that.”

Issel disagrees.

The onslaught resumed immediately after halftime, as the Vols apparently forgot what Meeks did to them in the first 20 minutes.

Late in the shot clock in Kentucky’s first possession following intermission, Meeks asked for a clear-out at the top of the key, drove on Prince, stumbled a bit, recovered and swished a jumper. Then came a drive past Tyler Smith from the wing. Then a 3 in transition. (Some courtside observers thought Meeks had a foot well inside the 3-point line, so Issel might ask for a review of the videotape.) Then he hit another 3 after a handoff from teammate Ramon Harris.

ESPN and CNNSIs hypocrisy in full view: Don Barksdale on the ’48 Olympics and Adolph Rupp. John Wooden, Sam Gilbert and Tark the Shark.

Don Barksdale was a pioneering athlete in the mid-20th Century.  He was a member of the Gold Medal 48 Olympic Basketball Team and the Philips Oilers Championship Team.

In 1948, he was the first African American to play with the U.S. Olympic team. He

joined the team in Basketball at the 1948 Summer Olympics. He became the first Africa-American basketball player to win a gold medal in the Summer Olympics.

Barksdale, who had been playing with the Amateur Athletic

Union‘s Oakland Bittners, was given an at-large berth from the independent

bracket, but not without heavy lobbying by Fred Maggiora, a member of the Olympic Basketball Committee and a politician in Oakland, which was adjacent to Barksdale’s hometown. About eight years later Maggiora told Barksdale that some committee members’ responses to the idea of having a black Olympian was “Hell no, that will never happen.” But Maggiora wouldn’t let the committee bypass Barksdale.[2]

“This guy fought, fought, and fought,” Barksdale said, “and I think finally the coach of Phillips 66 [Omar Browning] had said, ‘That son of a bitch is the best basketball player in the country outside of Bob Kurland, so I don’t know how we can turn him down.’ So they picked me, but Maggiora said he went through holy hell for it – closed-door meetings and begging.”

The 1948 Olympic team had five Kentucky Wildcats basketball players who had just won the very first Wildcat national championship in the 1948 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament. The rest of the Olympic team, consisting of the AAU Champions Phillips Oilers, and the Kentucky team later scrimmaged on Stoll Field in front of 14,000 spectators, the largest crowd to watch basketball in Kentucky at that time. Barksdale became the first African-American to play against Kentucky in Lexington. He could not stay at the hotel with the rest of the team, but instead stayed with a black host family.[3]

Adolph Rupp, the legendary Kentucky coach, was the assistant coach on the 1948 team under Omar Browning.[4]

“[Rupp] turned out to be my closest friend,” Barksdale said. “We went to London and won all 12 games and got the gold medal.” But he had to brush off indignities just about every step of the way. . . Later, coach Rupp told Barksdale, “Son, I wish things weren’t like that, but there’s nothing you or I can do about it.” Barksdale agreed. He lived by a very simple philosophy. He wasn’t interested in protest; he was interested in playing basketball. He had faced prejudice before, and he knew that he would face it again.

Does that sound like a racist.  Why does the American Sports Press get away with deriding Rupp as a racist when to a man his contemporaries both black and white say the exact opposite?  Look to Duke in 1966.  All White Team as well.  But somehow that fact is never mentioned in all of the talk of “walls tumbling down.”  When will these media types start to deal in fact.  Instead they lie and cheat and defame persons with innuendo, deception, lies and half truths.

There are hundreds of stories that attest to the lie that is perpetuated by ESPN and their crew of amatuers.  Yet, they refuse to back down from their slander.  All the while, they canonize a guy like John Wooden whose greatest booster openly paid his players.  Paid for their clothes, cars and abortions.  I’m not saying that Wooden doesn’t deserve his accolades.  He won and won big.  But his achievements are tainted with drug money.  Neither ESPN nor the NCAA will go near those stories.  Wooden lived in denial as Papa Sam paid for his rosters.  Either that or he was complicit in the violations.  Yet, Wooden will never be investigated.  What is the difference between Papa Sam and his relationship with Bill Walton and the Reggie Bush situation or the recent O.J. Mayo “scandal.”  There is no difference.  Except that Wooden was an untouchable.  Much like Coach K and his golden boosters giving away 6 figure salaries to receptionists and signing for homes for the parents of Duke Basketball recruits.  Chris Duhon and others spring readily to mind.

Speak to me of hypocrisy.  These supposed professionals cowardly destroy the reputation of one man after his death based on fallacies and lies.   All the while, they anoint another despite the hard truths behind his grand, yet tainted, achievements.

Monday, April 03, 2006

Adrian Wojnarowski: UCLA’s Tainted Dynasty

April 3, 2006
The Bergen County Record

INDIANAPOLIS — Everywhere Jerry Tarkanian goes at this Final Four, the blue and gold, the magical four letters, the thunderous U-C-L-A chants on the streets, bring Tark back to college basketball’s greatest dynasty, back to a name most synonymous with the championship seasons.

Only, it isn’t John Wooden.

Or Lew Alcindor.

Or Bill Walton.

“I think about Sam Gilbert,” Tark said Sunday afternoon.

And that’s the name that causes a roomful of frolicking Bruins boosters and fans to go uneasily quiet. Sam Gilbert, the two dirty little words of the dynasty.

For the record, Tark will go where others genuflecting at the altar of John Wooden will never journey. He’ll say the name that amid the hype for tonight’s UCLA-Florida national championship game, you’re guaranteed to never hear on CBS. The NCAA tournament loves its nostalgia, its mythology and you’ll be getting the full force of this farce from the RCA Dome.

“To people, John Wooden is a god,” Tark said.

It is a losing proposition to suggest that UCLA’s 10 national championships under Wooden were won with anything but the talent of great players and the lessons and leadership of a legendary coach. It just is never talked about — out in the open, anyway.

It was what it was, though: Sam Gilbert was a Los Angeles construction man who lavished the Wooden-era UCLA players with money, cars, gifts, the run of his mansion, whatever. Anything those players wanted, the dynasty’s sugar daddy was reputed to provide it.

“To this day, what blows me away — what still makes me angry — is that Sam Gilbert never tried to hide what he was doing,” Tark said. “But the NCAA was never going to investigate UCLA. They were the marquee team. They had all of the games on television. But I lived 20 minutes away in Long Beach and I knew what was going on there. The whole country, the NCAA, they all knew what Sam Gilbert was doing at UCLA.

“Hell, he bragged about it to a lot of people. He bragged about it to me. Once, he liked my point guard [Robert Smith] and said, ‘Why don’t you send him over to UCLA so I can take care of him?’ The NCAA was always harassing me, but Sam Gilbert was violating more rules than anyone in America.

“I was told that John Wooden used to always say that he wished Sam would stay away from the program. I was told that he went to [the AD] J.D. Morgan about it, and Morgan told him that he would take care of it. But it went on and on.”

These days, Tark is hardly on the UCLA warpath. Truth be told, he loves the Bruins’ coach, Ben Howland. As funny as it sounds, Tark will be sitting in Howland’s seats for the game tonight.
What’s more, Tark’s never had a personal problem with Wooden, who always was very nice and very generous with him through the years. His issue isn’t with Wooden, but a system that selectively punished cheaters.

This isn’t to absolve Tark by means of some great conspiracy to get him. He is a well-deserved and well-decorated NCAA probation loser at Long Beach, UNLV and Fresno State. I covered him for 2½ years in Fresno, had my drag-outs with him, but the years have taught me that some of the most respected names in the sport — some of the so-called giants — are the biggest crooks going. Tark always told me, and only in the last few years have I come to agree with him.

Ultimately, Tark thinks that if you want to believe that his four Final Fours and his 1990 national championship are tainted, then you have to take a look at UCLA, too. I always believed that his fight with the NCAA wasn’t so much about his own innocence, but the fact that there were competitors of his who had been deemed untouchable and never got popped too.

If you think this is just Tark barking at the moon, trying to justify his own misdeeds, consider a different source, someone whose agenda is beyond reproach. While working with Tark on his memoir “Running Rebel,” author Dan Wetzel dug up a Bill Walton quote from a 1978 book, “On the Road with the Portland Trail Blazers.”

If you ever want to debate that there is a double standard between the chosen programs and those branded as renegade by the NCAA, consider this stunning passage.

“UCLA players were so well taken care of — far beyond the ground rules of the NCAA — that even players from poor backgrounds never left UCLA prematurely (for pro basketball) during John Wooden’s championship years,” Walton said. “If the UCLA teams of the late 1960s and early 1970s were subjected to the kind of scrutiny Jerry Tarkanian and his players have been, UCLA would probably have to forfeit about eight national championships and be on probation for the next 100 years.

“… The NCAA is working night and day trying to get Jerry, but no one from the NCAA ever questioned me during my four years at UCLA.”

Here’s the thing, too: This doesn’t make Wooden less of a philosopher, less of a teacher, less of a great American icon. To me, it doesn’t change the fact that the afternoon I spent in his condo two years ago rates as one of the best days I’ve ever had in this business. It’s just a reminder there is no Camelot in sports. And there are no saints.

Wooden is 95 years old, bigger and more beloved than ever, and as Tark said one Hall of Fame coach told him this weekend, “People won’t really start talking about [Wooden’s] legacy until he’s gone.”

Wooden is still the kind of man, just like those Bruins were the kind of champions, who never will be duplicated. The banners are still hanging in Pauley Pavilion, the 100 years of probation that Walton swears would’ve been warranted never did come. Admire the UCLA history tonight, but don’t let yourself get lost in the mythology. There was no Camelot in college basketball, no saint.

E-mail: wojnarowski@northjersey.com

The Cats take on Marquette today

The Cats make the tournament in 2008 as an 11 seed in the West Region. A 12-4 run in the SEC regular season makes it possible.

First opponent: Marquette. 2:30 EDT in Anahem, California
UK has met Marquette in the NCAAs 9 times. This will be the 10th. Marquette has won the last two meetings with UK in the tournament. The last being the year that Dwayne Wade showcased his NBA Superstar potential and Bogans broke his ankle in the Wisconsin game. I haven’t seen any Marquette games this year. But from all I’ve read, UK is a slight favorite for an upset bid in round 1. If UK loses this game, it will be the first 1st round loss in over 15 years.

From the UK presser today, an interesting tidbit. Perry Stevenson was asked about UK fan expectations. Here’s the quote:

Or as Kentucky forward Perry Stevenson remarked when asked what Wildcats fans expect from their beloved basketball team: “Seven championships in six years.”

Hilarious and a nugget of truth as well.

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“We became a blue-collar team,” Stevenson said. “We come out and scrap and fight.”

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As you can see, Perry Stevenson is UK’s shot blocking phenom. Here’s to him swatting a dozen or so Marquette shots today. His emergence along with Jasper and Ramon Harris are the reasons that UK can still win minus Patrick Patterson. Perry really picked up his play though. A fairly amazing transformation from his Frosh campaign.

Perry has benefited from the loss of Patrick Patterson somewhat. Pat being out has given Perry room to grow and experience this year. I don’t think he would have been forced to grow as much if Pat was still in the game. Next year should see those two wreaking havoc down low and inside/out on teams. With the additions coming in, I think UK will be in fine shape for 2009.

But first this season must be played out:

GO CATS!!! BEAT MARQUETTE!!!

For all of you doubters, I’ll leave you with this:

“He just had so much belief in us,” Bradley said. “It was hard to doubt ourselves.”

Ramel Bradley on Coach Gillispie

I say the Cats advance in a bruiser.  Final Score:  Cats – 56  Golden Eagles – 50 

Coach Adolph Rupp plugs Coca Cola

Nothing wrong with that. This little “commercial” is from a Basketball Reel to Reel that I was able to get off of ebay a few years back. I had it converted to digits and now that I have a way to share it (this blog), I’ll be posting it on the blog over the next week. It’s a three part film on Individual Offense. It’s part of a larger effort with three other coaches and Coach Rupp explaining different aspects of the game. Of course, the game has changes a bit since these coaches were in their prime. I can’t find any information on the film on the web and the actual reels are in my storage room back in Kentucky. But I’ll post as much back ground information as I can gather.

I always find it interesting to hear Coach Rupp talking. You can tell the man has a love for Basketball and for the University of Kentucky. He smiles a lot in this film and talks to his team. From what I’ve read, he didn’t do that often in practice. So these film productions may have been a welcome respite from what I’ve read were immensely difficult practices in the Rupp Era. This film gives a quickshot of Harry Lancaster–Rupp’s longtime assistant.

mbb_history_ruppchalkboard.jpg I hope y0u enjoy.

Postgame interview with Coach Adolph Rupp

Coach Rupp was interviewed by Claude Sullivan after the 1966 National Championship loss to the Texas Western Miners.

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Claude Sullivan: OK, well it’s a tough one to give tonight because everybody in Kentucky and on this Standard Oil network, who was listening. I know that almost everyone of them was for these Kentucky Wildcats. And of course, it’s a heart-breaking thing because a journey that Adolph Rupp talked about earlier that began back in December, ended here on heartbreak highway tonight. For the Wildcats who now are sitting dejectedly across the floor. They came into this thing heavily favored, maybe that hurt them. The way these Washington papers played it up today as no contest, they thought Kentucky was going to walk away with it, maybe that hurt the Wildcats more than anything else.

Adolph Rupp: Seems, they made about 17 more free throws than we made, and I think that was the entire story of the game. We made, more, five more field goals than they made, that’s the fact of the case. But we didn’t play very good tonight. Texas Western made a lot of mistakes against our press, and I was sure we’d catch them. But I think it will show that the shooting average tonight did not take care of us at all. In the first half it was 33%, and I don’t believe it was much better than that in the second half.

And I’ve always told you on this program that shooting has taken care of us, but tonight it didn’t. And I don’t think we had a single boy that played up to par tonight.

Claude Sullivan: Coach Rupp I’m sure that a lot of people will be asking you, ‘How good is Texas Western’ ?

Adolph Rupp: Well, the way they handled the ball tonight, it’s a good ball club. I put them in the same class with Michigan, I put them in the same class with Tennessee, and Vanderbilt, teams like that. I think they’re a good ball club. They hit tonight, they hit very well tonight. They hit the clutch baskets when they needed it. We got them down there in the second half, I think we got them down to one point one time, two points another time, but we never could get the clutch basket. And it was our shooting that hurt us tonight. We missed shots. I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if the rebounding doesn’t show that we stayed on the boards with them pretty well, in spite of the fact that they’re much bigger than we were. But we just couldn’t shoot well.

Claude Sullivan: Coach Rupp did you feel that in the beginning of the game when after nine minutes you only had nine points, that it was bound to break for you with such a slow start.

Adolph Rupp: Yep, I told the boys at the half, I said we can’t play a miserable second half the way we played this first half. We gave them four baskets the first half that we shouldn’t have given to them. And, those two steals. I told the boys in the locker room, just before they came out at the beginning of the ball game, that they double team the boy bringing the ball up. But you can’t dribble the ball with your head down and not look around to see what’s going on, and that’s exactly what happened. Those were the two baskets, I believe, that hurt us early in the ball game. Then we gave another one by throwing the ball away, and they took it and threw it in and it got them a six point lead. And we never were able to get the momentum going after that. We started pressing a little bit then then and I think that’s the story.

Claude Sullivan: Well we’ll be back here at College Park talking with Coach Rupp in just one minute.

Claude Sullivan: Well the college basketball season is over, Coach Rupp, what are the plans now ?

Adolph Rupp: Well it’s been a long year, it’s been a good year, it’s been a better year than any of us ever dreamed it would be. Now then of course we’ve got to go out, we had a miserable recruiting year last year, one of the worst we’ve ever had. And we’ve got to go out and find us some boys, with size. This little button kid has gotten us an awful long way but, but it proves what I’ve been saying all year long, that when you get in there with those big guys who can dunk that thing, you’re going to be in trouble and that hurt us tonight, badly here. This team was very quick, they’re very fast, and although we did have five more field goals, they stepped up to that free throw line, they just got all the breaks in that way. So, I guess we just have to start a new string somewhere along the way and that’s just the way it’s going to be.

Claude Sullivan: Well, Coach Rupp, thank you very much for the visit, not only tonight but all season. We’ve certainly enjoyed being with you, it’s been wonderful. We’ve enjoyed it, and we’ll look forward to another year.

Adolph Rupp: Claude, thank you and thanks to the sponsors who have made this program possible, and I’ll come up and help you broadcast one of the Reds baseball games some day.

Claude Sullivan: Needed, he will be a knee high. Thank you coach and we’ll hold you to that promise.

Here at courtside at College Park Maryland, the Baron Rupp has bowed out for another college basketball season with a record of 27 and 2. Finished second in the NC double A’s, but for the first time in five tries, has lost the championship game.

________________________________________________

I always enjoy hearing or reading Coach Rupp talk about Basketball. I’ve recently purchased two of his books on coaching basketball. I purchased some original reel to reel footage of Rupp as well. Eventually, I plan on posting clips of Coach Rupp on here. Note in his comments the need then for the big man and the challenges of finding quality bigs. Gillispie is confronting that same challenge today. Another similarity to the present. Coach Rupp was a huge proponent of the Man to Man Defense. He felt that Zone Defenses should be used sparingly if at all. Gillispie is also similar to Rupp in that he is hot and heavy on discipline and conditioning.