Operation Enduring Freedom — Afghanistan Part 4

These are a set of old photos circa 2003.  A friend gave these to me on a disk that I’ve had in my storage room for about a decade.

This guy traveled all over the country.  Ghazni, Bamian, Bagram, Kabul.  So the photos are scatter shot and I can’t tell for certain where each photo was taken.  Some are obvious.  The Bamian Buddhas or what’s left of them are, of course, in Bamian.  Some of the photos are obviously from Kabul or Bagram.

Well, it’s obvious if you’ve been there.

Enjoy…Dave

 

 

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Operation Enduring Freedom — Afghanistan Part 3

These are a set of old photos circa 2003.  A friend gave these to me on a disk that I’ve had in my storage room for about a decade.

This guy traveled all over the country.  Ghazni, Bamian, Bagram, Kabul.  So the photos are scatter shot and I can’t tell for certain where each photo was taken.  Some are obvious.  The Bamian Buddhas or what’s left of them are, of course, in Bamian.  Some of the photos are obviously from Kabul or Bagram.

Well, it’s obvious if you’ve been there.

Enjoy…Dave

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Operation Enduring Freedom — Afghanistan Part 2

These are a set of old photos circa 2003.  A friend gave these to me on a disk that I’ve had in my storage room for about a decade.

This guy traveled all over the country.  Ghazni, Bamian, Bagram, Kabul.  So the photos are scatter shot and I can’t tell for certain where each photo was taken.  Some are obvious.  The Bamian Buddhas or what’s left of them are, of course, in Bamian.  Some of the photos are obviously from Kabul or Bagram.

Well, it’s obvious if you’ve been there.

Enjoy…Dave

 

 

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Operation Enduring Freedom — Afghanistan Part 1

These are a set of old photos circa 2003.  A friend gave these to me on a disk that I’ve had in my storage room for about a decade.

This guy traveled all over the country.  Ghazni, Bamian, Bagram, Kabul.  So the photos are scatter shot and I can’t tell for certain where each photo was taken.  Some are obvious.  The Bamian Buddhas or what’s left of them are, of course, in Bamian.  Some of the photos are obviously from Kabul or Bagram.

Well, it’s obvious if you’ve been there.

Enjoy…Dave

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Monetary Notes of the World


Unny and I had this table custom made for our new digs out in the ‘burbs.  Cost a bit, but, not too much.  It’s made from teak wood.  I wanted something in which to display the monetary notes which I’ve collected from my travels.  I only wish that I had some of the notes that are in my storage room back in the States.

There are notes in there from China, Dubai, Kuwait, Afghanistan, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, India, Iran, Bahrain, Egypt, Vietnam, North Korea and a few other countries.  As well as notes from old French Indochine.  The note with the tiger is from Vietnam during the US war era.  I actually got that one from ebay.com because I thought it was cool.

There are also coins in there from all over (Japan, Malaysia, EU, England, etc).  Some old ones but mostly newer coins.  I placed my three French Indochine Silver Dollars. They’re probably counterfeit, but, I don’t care.  That actually makes them a little more interesting to me and I paid a pittance for them.  3 or 4 bucks.  Nothing to cry over.  I knew or thought that they were fakes when I purchased them.

I also placed of couple of Greco-Bactrian coins in there.  Supposedly, they’re silver and over a thousand years old.  I don’t know.  So many fakes being sold in Afghanistan these days.  Even so, those coins are supposedly a dime a dozen over there.  Chances are they’re real.  They’re not rare, though.  At least not for anyone who’s traveled in Central Asia.  They’re all over the place there.  It is said that one can find them walking out in open ground or on fields and such.  They’re that common place.  Neat little pieces of history.

The necklace is a Kuchi piece that I purchased at a bazaar in Herat.  It’s made of brass and copper with a few worthless gems thrown in for good measure.  It has an old animist relief on it.  Looks to be an old Ganesh likeness to me. I also placed my Bamian Buddha stamps in the lower right corner and four little jewelry/snuff boxes.  The two with Camels depicted on them are from Dubai and made from silver and glazed to make the camel likenesses.  The other two I purchased in Herat.  Those two are supposed to be silver as well.  Though, I doubt it.

There you have it.  My little collection of monies (and sundry items) from around the world.

Bamiyan Buddha Afghan Commemerative Stamps

When I was a kid, I collected stamps. So when I came across this little gem, I had to pick it up. These stamps are from the time before the Soviet invasion. The time of King Zahir Shah. The last King of Afghanistan. They’re a link to a time when Afghanistan was at peace with itself. When it’s peoples were mostly just neighbors to one another. Before bin Laden and Mullah Omar. A time before sucide bombers and taliban and ruined cities and foreign occupations. This was a time when Afghans looked on their Western visitors as merely strange figures on whom they visited warm hospitality. It was a time when visitors were considered guests and were treated as such. ‘The pushtoon code meant something and the mehmet was indeed a welcomed and honoured guest whether they were Muslim, Christian, Hindu, Buddhist or Jew. Westerners weren’t peace keepers. We weren’t soldiers or policemen or civlian contractors for America or ISAF or NATO soldiers. Westerners were merely visitors with strange behaviors. Strangers who seemed to have an even stranger affinity for opium and hashish. Merchants from the West in search of carpets and tapestries, emeralds and rubies and lapis to sell in their homelands.

Back then, the hippy trail ran through Iran to Herat and on to Kabul. Lone travelers came and left unmolested. The Mustafa Hotel in Kabul gave some respite and a chance to shake off the dust of the road. It still stands and the occasional brave traveler stops there for a night or two until he moves on into Pakistan, Tibet, Nepal and India. I have read that some of the hippy communities still exist in Goa. I’m sure that there are others. Guys who dropped out of the West and traveled to Asia in search of peace or freedom or a final escape.

Afghanistan actually knew peace back in those days. Before the communists came and ruined everything. The King was attempting to make reforms. Give women rights. Construct a constitution. Educate his people and move them into the 20th Century.

What might have been.

So this is a “peace” of that time. A memento as the Afghans like to say. A small reminder that Afghanistan was not always as it finds itself now.

Interesting PDF on the Bamian Buddha Destruction